SuzumiYuki (清水有希) 路人甲
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发表于:2014-05-12 10:10 [只看楼主] [划词开启]

How thieves can use your mobile to empty your bank account via dodgy public WiFi connections and 'bluesnarfing'



Every day, hundreds of thousands of us pop into coffee shops. While we sip our cappuccinos, we may connect our smartphones to the cafes’ Wi-Fi network, and catch up with friends via services such as Facebook.


As well as socialising, we may use the time and free access to a wireless connection to get on top of our finances. That £75 you owe the plumber can be paid instantly by accessing your bank’s website or app. Transferring money from your savings account to your current account is nothing more than a few taps on your screen.


But what coffee drinkers do not suspect is that lurking among their fellow latte lovers are bank robbers. Unlike the figures of popular imagination, these thieves will not be wearing stockings over their head or brandishing a sawn-off shotgun.


Instead, the thief could be that smartly dressed middle-aged man hunched over his laptop, seemingly catching up on his emails. Or maybe it’s the student in the corner, chatting to a friend on his phone while tapping at a tablet computer.


Unbeknown to you, this modern form of bank robber is silently harvesting all your private data. The only sign of his thievery is perhaps a little smile as your bank log-in details appear on his screen, ready for him to copy and paste before plundering your account within seconds of you finishing your coffee.

In short, you’ve just been mugged — but you’ll only realise when you later go to a cash machine to withdraw some money, and discover that every penny in your account has been cleared out.


During an anxious phone call to the bank, you’ll learn that an online thief has hacked into your account and stolen all your money.


Although the bank will usually restore your balance, they won’t be able to restore the feeling of security you had before the cyber robbery.

One route is through your phone’s wireless ‘Bluetooth’ function, which, when switched on, allows it to ‘talk’ to other enabled devices nearby. This means that a hacker sitting near you can use his Bluetooth-enabled laptop to connect to your device without your knowledge. This process is sometimes called ‘bluejacking’ or, more properly, ‘bluesnarfing’ (from the slang word ‘snarf’ which means to eat, drink or devour).


However, this is relatively rare. The more common method is for crooks to use your smartphone’s Wi-Fi connection. They rely on the fact that most of us are blase about the security of the networks we connect to.

For example, when you are in a coffee shop, your smartphone will present you with a list of available Wi-Fi networks that you can use to connect your phone to the internet. The majority of these networks are run by legitimate companies, but sometimes they are actually created by a criminal sitting nearby with little more than a laptop.


These networks are often given innocent-sounding names, such as ‘Free Public Wi-Fi’, that gull smartphone users into logging in. On the surface, everything seems normal, and you will be able to connect just as you would with a legitimate Wi-Fi service.


However, because you have connected to a network controlled by a thief, he can monitor everything you do, enabling him to vacuum up passwords and login details for your bank account.

In fact, the process is so simple that the thieves can steal thousands of pounds in just a few hours while sitting in their local Starbucks.


最后编辑于:2014-05-12 10:11
分类: 英语
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